Lower level learning outcomes in college level courses?

Bloom’s Taxonomy is exactly that – a taxonomy, not a heirarchy.  And, students of many ages are capable of higher order thinking skills (e.g. my then 9yo daughter) like application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation; of course, students will exhibit different levels of proficiency and different levels of complexity in their thinking.

Here’s my question… Should there be any college level course that has learning outcomes that are predominantly, or worse yet, entirely at the lower levels of thinking per Bloom’s Taxonomy?  Is there any instance in which the outcome of the course should not be an ability to analyze, apply, synthesize or evaluate content related to the discipline? Continue reading

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My thoughts, as faculty, on #LectureFail

The Chronicle of Higher Education asked,

Is it time for more widespread reform of college teaching?

This series explores the state of the college lecture, and how technologies point to new models of undergraduate education.

Last month, we began inviting students across the countries to fire up their Web cameras or camera-phones to send us video commentaries about whether lectures work for them.

Chronicle.com/LectureFail displays a number of student comments, including a compilation, along with several faculty responses.

As a faculty member, as I watched several of the videos, I found my beliefs and attitudes to be more in line with the students than my faculty colleagues.  Personally, lectures are boring… for me… as a faculty member. I don’t like them, and pedagogically and historically, I find them to be an outmoded approach to teaching and learning. Why?

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Incentives for Course Feedback?

I work closely with end of course evaluation surveys.  At one institution, I administer the online survey system through which we survey students, and for the other institution, I rely heavily and place high value on feedback from students to help me continuously improve the course.  My question is, “How much is that feedback worth?” Continue reading

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Different Interpretations of “Course Embedded Assessment”

With a significant focus on the evaluation of our institutional general education curriculum/program, one concept I’ve encountered frequently of late is “course embedded assessment.”  However, I’ve discovered at least two different interpretations of the concept.  Continue reading

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Revising my grading rubric for discussion forum participation

After three iterations of the course I’m teaching, I’m revisiting and potentially revising the grading rubric I’m using to assess learner participation in discussion forums.  Back in August, I described the types of discussions in which my students in COSC 1401 Introduction to Computers are asked to participate and posted the grading rubric for assessing their participation.  I have been using that rubric the last three terms (I’m teaching primarily 8 week terms; two last fall and one so far this spring).  But, it’s not quite a perfect fit to how the discussions have progressed and how I want to grade them.  So, I’m revising.  I’m interested in your thoughts on this rubric. Continue reading

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